by Garneau

Welcome to ''repair, rejuvenation and renovation'' season otherwise incorrectly referred to as the off-season.  It is absolutely not the “off” season. It is the “the” season to lay the foundation for 2019 – to heal any injuries, to revive your spirit and to strengthen your weak links. Motivation is challenging with the lack of daylight, the cold and the very distant race schedule. Here are some tips to spark up your preparation for summer 2019:

Establish a short-term early season goal. Your goal may be Subaru IRONMAN 70.3 Muskoka in July, but aim for a winter goal such as a March ½ marathon or a destination race. Since these are not likely to be “A” races, set a mini goal for each of them such as boosting your run speed, honing your mental or nutritional game, perfecting your pacing etc.

Write your goals on a card and stick it on your bathroom mirror. Stare your goals in the face each morning. When you read, “I want to run faster in March”, you will be excited to lace up your shoes.

Visualize the benefit of completing the activity. It is easy to say, “it is too cold to run” and then roll over and sleep. What you are really saying is “I am going to stay in bed because I want to be slow at the March ½ marathon”. Instead, focus on the benefit of executing each workout – “I will get fitter, faster, be energized for the day and be so proud of myself when this session is done.” Picture yourself doing the training and see the associated benefits. Then, contrast that with the picture of skipping of the workout and the associated regret.

Schedule your workouts for the morning before work. The only thing competing for your time in the morning is sleep but if you postpone workouts to the evening, now training has to compete with dinner, playtime, socials, rest, television and general relaxation. Wake up, train, feel accomplished and on task for the rest of the day.

Plan a winter training camp, weekend clinic or training seminar. Think of this as a physical and mental retreat where you will learn new skills, get fit and re-charge your battery in pursuit of your sport. Every profession has team building weekends or motivational meetings. Triathlon needs a “spa day” as well where you can grow as an athlete in mind, body and spirit.

Keep a training log and include your daily emotions as well as workout data. At the end of the week, write down what you did well and what you can improve on for next week. Be honest.  When you overcome a hurdle in your preparation, you will be empowered. This is your short story of your journey to your goal. Make it a piece of art. Be creative.

Establish a theme for each month of the winter. This mantra should motivate you and should be personal. For example, since December is likely to be busy, social and sporadic, your January/February theme might be “Routine”. Then each morning, repeat “Routine” to yourself. Write it on your bathroom mirror and on every page of your journal and that will be your mental cue to get the workout done.

Surround yourself with like-minded people at least once per week. Share these tips with someone else and then check up each other to see how you are doing. Compare training journals. Show each other your goal cards. Discuss your themes. When you share motivation, you will be motivated.

There is no question that the winter can play havoc on your triathlon training. But a positive, on task and goal-driven mind is stronger than any winter storm. Your attitude is trainable and controllable. If you can overcome the usual training winter lulls, then imagine how indestructible you will be when you hit a curveball in the middle of your goal race. Attitude is more important than fact. The fact is that winter is tough on our triathlon inspirations. Let your attitude rise up and make you a champion of winter and then a champion on race day.

March Fitness Boost brought to you by LBT coaches Dave Cracknell and Lisa Bentley

Lisa Bentley raced for 20 years as a professional triathlete, winning 11 Ironman and 16 Ironman 70.3 events. During that time, she learned and lived the tactics for being a champion whether in sport, business or life. But Lisa was the most unlikely champion. She has cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic lung disease. But she turned cystic fibrosis into a gift and found a way to squash her genetic blueprint with a sturdy work ethic, fierce desire, clear goals and an unwavering belief in self. Now she help others learn how to win in life and how to be the best they can be with the cards they’ve been dealt.

Swim

Option A – 3000 m

15 x 200 (includes warm up)

Set 1 – 5 x 200 as follows:

#1 and #2 are 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#3 and #4 are 2nd 100 faster than the first;

#5 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 3 after the first 2);

Set 2 – 4 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#2 and 3 are 2nd 100 faster than the first;

#4 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 3 after #1);

Set 3 – 3 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#2 is 2nd 100 faster than the first;

#3 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 2 after #1);

Set 4 – 2 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#2 all fast;

Set 5 – 1 x 200 warm down

 

Option B – 2000 m

10 x 200 (includes warm up)

Set 1 – 4 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 200;

#2 and 3 are 2nd 100 faster than the first;

#4 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 3 after #1);

Set 2 – 3 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#2 is 2nd 100 faster than the first;

#3 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 2 after #1);

Set 3 – 2 x 200 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100, then 100 smooth;

#2 all fast;

Set 4 – 1 x 200 warm down

 

Option C – 1500 m

15 x 100 (includes warm up)

Set 1 – 5 x 100 as follows:

#1 and #2 are 25 drill/swim for 100;

#3 and #4 are 2nd 50 faster than the first;

#5 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 3 after the first 2);

Set 2 – 4 x 100 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100;

#2 and #3 are 2nd 50 faster than the first;

#4 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 3 after #1);

Set 3 – 3 x 100 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100;

#2 is 2nd 50 faster than the first;

#3 all solid (so essentially descend 1 to 2 after #1);

Set 4 – 2 x 100 as follows:

#1 is 25 drill/swim for 100;

#2 all fast;

Set 5 – 1 x 100 warm down

 

Bike

15 min loosen warming up to about 70% of max HR (aerobic);

15 min at 30 sec hard – 1:30 easy at 90 rpm;

1 min hard (try to hold the same watts) – 2 min easy at 90 rpm;

repeat that 5-min set 3 times;

then ride 10 min steady increasing gear/watts/effort every 1 min for 5 min then repeat (back to where you started) for another 5 min (continuous);

3-5 min easy; (43-45)

18 minutes as follows:

45 sec hard – 1:15 easy at 90 rpm;

1:30 min hard (try to hold the same watts) – only 1 min easy at 90 rpm;

repeat that 4:30 set 4 times;

then ride 10 min steady increasing gear/watts/effort every 1 min for 5 min then repeat (back to where you started) for another 5 min (continuous);

warm down to 90 min

**Use the first 15 min set as further warm up

**You can shorten this workout to 60 minutes by eliminating the 2nd 10-min block of steady work and shorten the final 18-min set to 9 minutes

**Hard efforts are relative to the rest given – so more rest allows for harder effort

**10 min steady is similar to race effort

 tri-men

Run

Treadmill steady state – 40-60 min total

The best way to tackle the treadmill is to think of it as your bike trainer – it can be more focused than an outdoor run especially in the winter when your footing is compromised, but it is hard to hold pace on a treadmill since it requires huge focus and discipline.

So let’s divide your run into 10 min blocks with the goal of hitting speeds that you would not reach outside (but this is not intervals – just steady running) think of this in 10 min blocks :

Warm up 10 minutes to best mph; start at easy mph and increase the mph every 1 minute – the TM will trick you into thinking that you are running as fast as you can but when you nudge up the mph, you realize that you can actually handle it pretty well – so go for it and nudge up the mph every 1 min as you warm up;

1 min easy as you like;

Then 2-4 x 10 min steady blocks (depending on how long you are running for) – each building to best mph but then hovering around that mph and dipping above and below;

1-2 min easy in between;

Easy run to finish your run feeling invigorated and so proud of yourself for injecting some quality into your 40-60 min run

**Aim to make each 10-min block a bit stronger – that is, when you get to your best mph (let’s say that is 7.5 mph) then hover around there so 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6 etc., to see what you can do – this is like a 20-40 min tempo with little rests in-between.

tri-women